After the dinosaurs disappeared, huge animals known as megafauna roamed the Earth. While many of them were wiped out in a mass extinction, some of their descendants remain with us today.
Woolly mammoth

Woolly mammoth

EXTINCT MAMMOTH CAVE

Woolly mammoths most likely used their tusks to dig up plants and strip bark from trees.

Asian elephant

Asian elephant

LIVING ELEPHANTS OF ASIA

Unlike their extinct relatives and African cousins, only the males have tusks.

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Sabre-toothed cat

Sabre-toothed cat

EXTINCT VALLEY OF GIANTS

Scientists think saber-toothed cats used their fangs to deliver fatal bites to prey.

African Lion

African Lion

LIVING WILD AFRICA

The saber-toothed cats probably lived in social groups, much like today’s lions.

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Giant ape

Giant ape

EXTINCT VALLEY OF GIANTS

Once the largest apes in the world, giant apes foraged for fruits, leaves and tubers on the forest floor.

Orangutan

Orangutan

LIVING ORANGUTANS

Orangutans are most comfortable in the tree canopy, unlike their giant relatives. They eat fruits and pass out seeds in their poop as they travel through the treetops. This helps seeds grow better.

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Shiva’s beast

Shiva’s beast

EXTINCT VALLEY OF GIANTS

The Shiva’s beast was the largest member of the giraffe family. It had a tongue that was probably long enough to lick its own ears clean!

Giraffe

Giraffe

LIVING WILD AFRICA

Giraffes use their long, agile tongue to reach for leaves from the top of thorny acacia trees.

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Giant Siberian rhino

Giant Siberian rhino

EXTINCT VALLEY OF GIANTS

Also called the ‘Siberian unicorn’ for its extraordinary horn, thought to be 1m or longer.

White rhino

White rhino

LIVING WILD AFRICA

The white rhino has two horns. The front horn is the longer one, averaging 60cm in length.

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Extinction on a behemoth scale

66 million years ago, mammals took over from the dinosaurs as the largest land animals.

Hornless rhinos weighing at least 10 times more than any living rhino once roamed the Earth. Giant wombats as tall as an adult human. Armadillos with clubs for tails.

But around 125,000 years ago, these megafauna started disappearing. Today, none of them are left.

Journey back to the past to meet some of these extinct behemoths and rediscover modern-day megafauna.

Let’s pledge to end extinction

Some scientists believe humans caused the extinction of megafauna of days gone by. We are now in the middle of the sixth mass extinction. If we don’t take action to protect the megafauna of today, they, too, may soon die out. Will you join us in saving modern-day megafauna?

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