Through dedicated partnerships with local government and NGOs, we have not only supported a community of home-grown field scientists to undertake conservation-related activities, but also catalysed the development of National Conservation Strategies and Action Plans for three native species - the Raffles' banded langur, Sunda pangolin and the endemic Singapore freshwater crab.

 Click here to download ‘Wildlife Matters’, an e-book which captures 10 years of conservation action made possible with support from the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund (WRSCF).

No matter the species, proper conservation planning relies on having an accurate estimate of the population sizes of wildlife. One of the most accurate ways to estimate the population size of amphibians is through acoustic monitoring, because amphibians call to attract mates and to signal that they occupy the territory they are in. Acoustic techniques have been used for a long time across the world to collect information of vocalising animals like birds, amphibians and insects. The trouble with collecting vocalisations by amphibians is that their activity and the audibility of their calls is affected by the structure of the environment. We don’t fully understand how habitat structures and urban noise alters amphibian calling and the audibility of their calls. Furthermore, we know very little about amphibians in Southeast Asia as this kind of data isn’t readily available.
No matter the species, proper conservation planning relies on having an accurate estimate of the population sizes of wildlife. One of the most accurate ways to estimate the population size of amphibians is through acoustic monitoring, because amphibians call to attract mates and to signal that they occupy the territory they are in. Acoustic techniques have been used for a long time across the world to collect information of vocalising animals like birds, amphibians and insects. The trouble with collecting vocalisations by amphibians is that their activity and the audibility of their calls is affected by the structure of the environment. We don’t fully understand how habitat structures and urban noise alters amphibian calling and the audibility of their calls. Furthermore, we know very little about amphibians in Southeast Asia as this kind of data isn’t readily available.